Thirsty Thursday – Bottles & Bubbles

I was inspired by an assignment in my Blogging University, Blogging 101 class¬†to do a Gallery post and so I snapped a few pics of last night’s Kenner Food and Wine event at Chateau Country Club. I know this “Thursday” post is going out on a Friday, but since the event happened on a Thursday, I think I’m safe ūüôā

Last night’s event was a mash-up of several areas of my life: held in the city I work in, attended by people I work with, hosted by the wife of the Mayor I work for, worked by friends of mine and friends I haven’t seen in years. Proceeds went to a regional¬†foundation¬†and ¬†local restaurants and wine distributors offered unlimited¬†¬†delectables and vino. Merriment was the order of the night and an amusing (albeit hot & muggy) time seemed to be had by all.

It’s the kind of event that’s happening all the time but can be easily missed by excuses of weeknight, other obligations, poor weather, etc. which is a shame because the excuses are never as rewarding as the attendance.

So here are a few (iPhone) pictures in hopes of inspiring you to attend a fun, neighborhood event and support local businesses, charities and people!

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Tables of wine lined the outdoor pool area. Tastings and info of all were provided by knowledgeable reps.

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Team Gleason glasses echoed the love of city & Saints in attendees’ hearts.

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The space was awash in a cool color palate of lighting.

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Friend and rep, Rene (right)

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Arguably the most popular table…the CHAMPS!

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I drank many glasses of Perrier-Jou√ęt but when that ran out, this cuvee’ and rose’ were both excellent!

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The “almost” sister-in-law and wine rep, Celeste (right) *side note* I LOVE this girl!

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Exceptional example of smart social media branding. Clean, classy, simple! #KWFE

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The aftermath: abandoned tables and empty bottles.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Make Merriment, Live-it-up with Locals, Care for Charities!

 

Readers, what’s a local or charity event you attended that you’re so glad you didn’t miss out on?!

 

 

 

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B is for … Bargains: Better Buds Bash

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We’re into the second month of the blog and the second letter. For the month of September, B’s theme is going to be “Better” in a ¬†series of posts about simple ways to do things better. Brilliant!

Today’s do-better theme,¬†Entertaining and Dinner Parties:

 

 

Entertaining:

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  • Presentation is key –¬†When setting out food for entertaining, remember the old adage – We eat with our eyes first. I know that a good part of my presentation OCD comes from my event planning days, but those were valuable lessons learned.¬†No-one sees the container the food comes out off, just the plate they take the food from – The lesson here is to go with the store brand or an alternative, cheaper option when possible with the food and serve it up in an eye-appealing way.
    • I love me some Water Crackers but at upwards of $4 a box, they’re a bit more than I want to pay for a snack “accessory”! There are many tasty alternatives like rice-crackers that come in several¬†yummy flavors (Whole Foods 365 are delicious) and usually retail closer to $1 a box. Less expensive, crusty bread sliced in a basket looks rustic and inviting next to a cheese plate & a loaf can go for $1 from the grocery.
    • Wine in a box has come a long way in taste and quality over the last decade, offering award-winning wine at “bulk” prices, which is what you’re looking for when serveral bottles are likely to be poured. Black Box is a personal favorite of mine and several of my girlfriends. Just because the wine comes in a box doesn’t mean it has to be placed out for spigot use. Decanting that box wine makes for a lovely presentation and can enhance¬†the taste through aeration and temperature; red wine will be kept at room temperature and white wine decanters are designed to keep the wine chilled.
  • Sharing is caring – As much as I love a visually appealing spread, having not yet become the recipient of a bridal registry, I’m lacking when it comes to presentation dishware. Buying them would throw my entire budget, however I know friends who do very well with thrifting for them. My suggestion, borrow from relatives, other friends, or even the friends you are hosting. Make the effort to collect from them in advance of the party and return the dishware washed and with a short “Thank You” note soon after. The small effort to collect and return equals huge payoff for a fabulous table setting.
    • Or skip the fancy dishes all together and place plain dishware on a clever table topper! Pinterest in full of “chalkboard table” ideas!
  • A little bit $$$ a lot of $ – When planning entertainment dishes like snacks, apps, small bites, ¬†remember a rule of thirds. For every one pricier item, have two lower priced items, and make your pricier items only up to a third of the entire spread.
    • I love cheese and love, love, love a cheeseboard. Probably because I could sit and eat the whole thing! (Don’t judge) As much as I would like a cheeseboard full of Humboldt Fog¬†and Roquetfort, I’m balling on a budget. Following the thirds-rule, I make sure my¬†board has plenty of less expensive items on the spread: grapes, carrots, olives, nuts (drizzle with oil and cajun spices, toast in oven for a few mins for extra pizzazz),¬†slices of¬†delicious and inexpensive sharp cheddar, and let’s not underestimate the wonders of a block of store-brand cream-cheese with a pepper jelly on top.
    • Whole Foods has a basket of cheeses in the cheese department that’s¬†filled with¬†the odds-and-ends of the cheeses; the “last piece” basket. The pieces are usually no more than $5. Rummage through and pick out a few pieces. Spot these around your cheese board for variety and interest.

 

Dinner Parties:

 

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  • What’s growing = what’s cheapest –¬†Though we live in a magical world of year round produce where you can get strawberries in the dead of winter, the most economical selections are those that traveled the least distance and are in season. Make sure to plan your meal around what’s growing to cut costs and ensure a superior product.
  • Shop with your eyes, then with your wallet – Grab the grocery publications or check online for the sales they are running. Plan a menu around that. This rule also applies for drinks and snacks for a dinner party.
    • If hummus is on sale, for instance, I will usually reduce or forgo the cheese plate for hummus and veggies. Delicious and easy frozen meatballs on special? You bet they’re going in a small bite dish for a party or as an app for a dinner!
    • This is also a great way to get pricier items on the plate. If it’s a rare occasion when crab claws are on sale, just one or two on each plate can really fancy-up the meal of a small gathering.¬†Asparagus can be pricey but I love to scoop it up when it’s on special.
  • Good food is good food, period – Many people assume, because they are having company over, they should serve “only the best” to their guests. While I agree your guests should get the best you have to offer, what you have to offer should fit your budget.
    • Can’t afford to serve everyone steak? Go for a more economical cut of meat, like flank steak and serve it in a creative way (try it atop the Triple Threat Salad) or make beef stroganoff with inexpensive stew meat (Bonus: it can be made in the slow-cooker before the party).
  • No leftovers zone – Be reasonable with yourself about how much to serve your guests. Remember that restaurant sizes are not a good guide for serving sizes and that you will not be providing guests with to-go boxes. While second helpings are nice to offer, how many of your ¬†guests do you¬†anticipate¬†having them? If you have served snacks before a dinner party meal, your portion sizes at dinner can be smaller; same if there is a starter, salad, dessert, etc.

 

In Sum: Plan for the sale and the season. Follow the thirds rule and aim for the inexpensive. Presentation over brand-name and  delicious over expensive.

And the most important thing to remember is the reason you are feeding…to gather everyone together for good food and a good time! It’s about company and memories, so¬†concern yourself more with being a gracious host/hostess than a well-to-do one!

Bidding you Blissful Bashes! 

Thirsty Thursday – A is for Aperitif

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For SAS‘s first Thirsty Thursday I wanted to stick with the letter of the month, A, and focus on a little known, often misunderstood realm of the alcohol world, the Ap√©ritif.

 Dictionary.com defines an apéritif as:

noun, plural apéritifs

 

[ah-per-i-teefs; Frencha-pey-ree-teef] (Show IPA)

1.

a small drink of alcoholic liquor taken to stimulate the appetite before a meal.
2.
Also called apéritif wine. a wine served as an appetizer or cocktail.

The drink is meant to stimulate your appetite not kill it with booze or get you so drunk that you can’t experience¬†the meal. Like the difference between a true appetizer and the American small-plate, one is meant to precede the meal and one is meant to be a part of the meal. In this way an ap√©ritif should be simplistic in its construction and presentation. While it’s taste can be complex to awaken the palate, an ap√©ritif should be clean not cloying and light not rich.

Apéritifs are not defined by only liquor or only one type of liquor and include some wines. They are, however, designated by  general guidelines that include having a lower alcohol content than some hard liquors and erring on the side of dry rather than sweet. Common choices for an apéritif include vermouth, brut champagnes, bitters & soda, anise flavored liquors, dry sherry, and varieties of dry white wine.

I found a very informative and interesting post from¬†thekitchn¬†entitled All About Aperitifs¬†(shout out to the letter of the month & alliteration *whoop-whoop*). The article breaks down various popular¬†ap√©ritifs and lists other options for pre-dinner drinks, including a personal favorite of mine, Pimm’s! The liquor, Pimms No. 1 Cup, is the¬†¬†main ingredient of¬†an English and New Orleans classic, the Pimm’s Cup, a crisp and refreshing drink that tastes (in certain variations) like an iced tea that knows a sexy secret.

Celebrate the waning Summer by making one today!

Pimm’s Cuppimms-cup

makes one drink

1 1/2 ounces Pimm’s No. 1 Cup
lemonade (or ginger ale or lemon-lime soda)
lemon slices
cucumber slices
(optional: orange slice, fresh borage and/or mint leaves, apple slices, strawberry)

Half-fill a Collins glass with ice and a few slices of cucumber, borage leaves, or other garnishes. Add measure of Pimm’s, then top up glass with lemonade or soda. Stir gently and add additional ice if necessary. Garnish with slices of lemon and cucumber. (recipe thekitchn)

Or visit two New Orleans establishments known for their Pimm’s Cups: Down¬†a Pimm’s in the presence of portraits ¬†of the late french monarch, dust from as far back as 1797, and perhaps a ghost or two at¬†Napoleon House¬†.¬†Leisurely sip a Pimm’s Cup shaded from the afternoon sun on the porch of The Columns Hotel¬†surrounded by hundred year old oak trees, crunching on the fat cumber garnish while streetcars roll by.

So whether you venture out to eat in New Orleans during COOLinary month or make a special meal at home, this August,

Appreciate An Apéritif!